Impala and Peacock

Jasmine Pearl Tea

$29.00

An incredible naturally scented green tea using an ancient technique that has been enjoyed for over 900 years (also known as Buddhas tears).

The tea bud and tea leaves are plucked and rolled into a perfect pearl (all by hand). Fresh jasmine flowers are harvested, kept chilled and carefully layered over the tea as the sun sets. As the flowers gradually warm over night the jasmine blossoms open and release their perfume slowly - the tea absorbs some of the perfume transferring the natural fragrance. The next morning the jasmine flowers are carefully removed and the process is repeated 5 nights in a row with each cycle requiring about 10kg of flowers for every 1kg of tea. These are the highest grade of Jasmine Pearls available.

The flavour is sweet, smooth and naturally aromatic.

1 tsp to 200mL cup

80°C degree water temperature

3 min steep (the same leaf can be used for 3 infusions)

If you do not have a temperature-controlled kettle let the water cool for 5-7 minutes after it has been boiled. Repeat the process above for subsequent infusions. Continue adding 30 seconds to 1 minute for each time you re-steep to get the best flavour.

Camellia Sinensis (the tea plant)

Jasmine flowers were first introduced to China between 206 BCE to 220 CE in the Han dynasty. Given that jasmine pearl tea requires such a high level of skill and flowers it was exclusively reserved for the emperor during this period.

The health properties of green tea (camellia sinensis) have been extensively studied with some of the green tea benefits including cancer-fighting properties (antiangiogenic) [1, 2, 7, 14, 15, 16] and for protection from cardiovascular diseases [3]. A 2010 literature review [12] summarised green tea as anti-inflammatory [4], antiarthritic [5], antibacterial [6], antioxidative [8, 17], antiviral [9], neuroprotective [10], cholesterol-lowering [11]” and improving fertility in humans and animals [17].

The caffeine and polyphenols found in green tea have also been shown to increase weight loss [13] offering science to the cultural use of green tea for weight loss. One specific polyphenol found in green tea has been the focus of much of the research, epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), with specific links of EGCG to many of the health properties mentioned earlier [17].


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